SB 375 seems to require MOSERS to give credit for military service if one has 10 years of MOSERS time. If that Bill were to pass, what would happen if

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SB 375 seems to require MOSERS to give credit for military service if one has 10 years of MOSERS time. If that Bill were to pass, what would happen if I had already paid for my military time? Would you give me additional credit? Refund my money and then give me credit? Do nothing?

SB 375, if passed, allows MSEP 2000 members with at least 10 years of credited service to receive additional credit for qualifying military service provided they were discharged under honorable conditions. In its current form the bill does not specifically address what, if anything, would be done for those individuals that have already purchased their military service. Since that is the case, it appears as if those who already purchased service would receive credit for any additional military service not already reflected on their record. This bill does not authorize a refund for previously purchased service. Print Friendly and PDF

Without considering SB 466, can a retired state employee continue to work for the state for up to 1,000 hours per year?

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Without considering SB 466, can a retired state employee continue to work for the state for up to 1,000 hours per year?
A retiree can work for the state and still receive MOSERS benefits as long as the position in which the retiree is working is not eligible for benefits. Generally that would mean that the position requires less than 1,000 hours of work per year. The decision as to whether or not a position is benefit eligible is made by the employing agency. Print Friendly and PDF

I understand Senate Bill 466 proposed by Senator Vogel to lower the points to retire to 78 points plus is coming to the floor next week

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I understand Senate Bill 466 proposed by Senator Vogel to lower the points to retire to 78 points plus is coming to the floor next week to be read again. Is this correct? Do you think it has a chance of passing?
A quick check of the General Assembly website shows that SB 466 had its second reading on March 2, when it was assigned to the Senate Pensions, Veterans' Affairs and General Laws committee. Once a bill is assigned to a committee, the next step is for there to be a public hearing. The typical hearing process is for the bill to be presented by its sponsor and then both proponents and opponents are invited to speak in favor of or in opposition to the bill. At this point there has not been a hearing on this bill and, at this point, we are not aware of a hearing having been scheduled. The bill must be voted out of committee in order to move on to the next step in the process, which would be placement of the bill on the perfection calendar for consideration and further debate by the full Senate.

At this point it is not possible to know whether or not the bill will pass. There are seven weeks left in this legislative session and many important bills, including the state budget, are not yet finalized. Print Friendly and PDF

Why has there been no movement on SB 466?

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Why has there been no movement on SB 466?
We have no way of knowing why SB 466 has not moved forward. Each year, many more bills are introduced than can possibly be addressed during the session. The leadership in the legislature has the difficult job of sorting through all the proposals and deciding which bills will be taken up for consideration.

Additionally, legislators just recently received information regarding the fiscal impact of this bill. The bill has been referred to committee and members of that committee will have to evaluate it to determine if they think it would be cost-effective. Print Friendly and PDF