We are continuing to hear that rumors are spreading about the legislature

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We are continuing to hear that rumors are spreading about the legislature considering a retirement incentive proposal when they meet in the special session that the governor may be calling later this year. According to the Office of Administration, the Governor does not intend to include a retirement incentive bill in his special session call. If the subject is not included in the Governor's special session call, it cannot be taken up by the legislature during the special session. Print Friendly and PDF

I heard a "rumor" that the governor is looking at discontinuing "80 and out" for retirement.

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I heard a "rumor" that the governor is looking at discontinuing "80 and out" for retirement. If so, what would be the process and possible time frame to reach a decision like this?
The 2005 legislative session ended May 13, 2005, without any legislative proposals to eliminate the "Rule of 80." If legislators and/or the Governor were interested in submitting such legislation, proposals could be drafted and pre-filed in December 2005, or during the first few months of the 2006 legislative session, which begins next January. MOSERS tracks all retirement legislation on a daily basis during session. The legislature would have until mid-May 2006 to deliberate on any such proposed legislation and the bill would have to pass both the House and the Senate, and then be signed into law by the Governor. MOSERS hasn't received questions or comments from the Governor's Office or from legislators concerning potential legislation to eliminate the Rule of 80 provision. Print Friendly and PDF

How is backdrop affected by leave without pay?

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How is backdrop affected by leave without pay?
A break in service after reaching the first date you were eligible for normal retirement precludes eligibility for the BackDROP. However, an approved leave of absence during this period will not. For example, if you work long enough past your normal retirement date to qualify for the BackDROP and have an approved leave for a few weeks and become re-employed, your eligibility for BackDROP will not be compromised. On the other hand, if you terminate employment and two months later return you would no longer be eligible for the BackDROP. Print Friendly and PDF

I have 3 years left until I qualify for 80 and out. If I should leave state government

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I have 3 years left until I qualify for 80 and out. If I should leave state government now for another job....can I come back later and finish my 80 and out...is there a time limit on being out of state government and coming back?
There is no time limit on the "Rule of 80." As long as you are vested, you may leave state employment at any time, and return later if you choose. The sum of your age (minimum age 48) and your years of service must equal 80 or more. If you leave state employment, your age will increase, but your service will not. Therefore, it will take you longer to reach the "Rule of 80" than if you were actively employed and increasing both your state service and age at the same time. Those individuals first employed on or after 7/01/2000 must retire directly from active employment to qualify for the "Rule of 80." Print Friendly and PDF

I am a vested employee with 7 years of service. If my job is lost through Base

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I am a vested employee with 7 years of service. If my job is lost through Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) and I leave state employment, what becomes of my accumulated sick leave? I have over 400 hours. Thank you.
If your state job is eliminated through the BRAC process (or any other state layoff process), your unused sick leave may be reinstated if you return to state service within 5 years. MOSERS asked the Office of Administration, Division of Personnel to summarize the current Personnel Advisory Board regulations governing leave. Those regulations [1 CSR 20-5.020(2)(H)] provide that accumulated and unused sick leave is credited to employees who return to state employment within five years of leaving the state service. A returning employee should be prepared to provide a written statement from the former employing agency specifying the basis on which sick leave was earned, the period of service involved and the total unused leave accumulated. With SAM II, this latter provision is less of an issue than when each agency maintained their own leave records, but you may want to keep a copy of your leave record in case it is needed in the future. Your best source of information on potential reinstatement of sick leave credit is your agency personnel office, so be sure to contact them for more specific information.
For retirement purposes under the Missouri State Employees' Plan 2000 (MSEP 2000), if you are vested when you leave state employment, you will receive one month of service credit for every 168 hours of unused sick leave. For example, if you have 400 hours of unused sick leave, you would receive 2 months of service credit upon leaving your position. Your unused sick leave must be reported to MOSERS by your employer in order to receive credit. Unused sick leave will be used in calculating the amount of your retirement benefit. Under the MSEP plan, to receive credit for your unused sick leave, you must be eligible for normal or early retirement when you leave state employment. Print Friendly and PDF

This bill has some language in it about treating persons on LTD the same as active employees on insurance and retirement. What is meant by that?

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This bill has some language in it about treating persons on LTD the same as active employees on insurance and retirement. What is meant by that?
This bill did not pass. However, the provision you mentioned above would have clarified the language regarding our LTD contract with The Standard Insurance Company. For all intents and purposes, this would have reinforced that we treat LTD claimants essentially as active employees for purposes of our benefits.
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I retired in 1995 under the rules that the COLA would be a minimum of 4% or a max of 5%...what is the COLA for the coming year? 4% or 5% and why is it

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I retired in 1995 under the rules that the COLA would be a minimum of 4% or a max of 5%...what is the COLA for the coming year? 4% or 5% and why is it not more widely publicized?
Members who retired under the MSEP, who were employed before August 28, 1997 are guaranteed at least a 4% cost of living allowance (COLA) each year until their benefit reaches 165% of the initial amount. All other retired members (those retired under the MSEP 2000, or those under the MSEP who were initially employed with the state after August 28, 1997) will received a COLA based on 80% of the change in the Consumer Price Index. This number is calculated each year by our Benefit Auditor. For 2005, the calculated COLA is 2.13%. Since this number is not greater than 4%, the 2005 COLA for MSEP members hired before August 28, 1997 is 4%.
MOSERS posts this COLA information on our website and in our General Employees' Retirement Handbook. For more information on how COLAs are calculated, see our COLA page under retired members. We also send retirees an annual statement that specifies the amount of the COLA. This statement is received during the month the COLA is applied to your benefit.
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I have heard that Gov. Blunt might call a special session in September.

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I have heard that Gov. Blunt might call a special session in September. I have heard that there may be a slim chance that the retirement incentive might again be discussed at this session. Both me and my wife are state workers who are eligible for retirement and would like to leave as soon as possible. What would happen if she went ahead and retired and I continued working long enough to see if the incentive might pass in the special session? Would I be able to pick her up on my insurance? Also if I do this what would happen If I passed away before she did? Would she then be able to pick her insurance back up again?
Various media have reported that the Governor may call a special session, probably around the time of the veto session in September, to deal with an issue unrelated to the retirement incentive. As of today, there is no notice of a special session on the Governor's website. We have no information from the Governor's office indicating that the retirement incentive will be included in the special session call. The legislature can only address items that are included in the special session announcement, which are generally limited to one or two key issues.
Unfortunately, we cannot answer your specific questions about the health care coverage because the answers would depend first upon the issue being included in any call for a special session and, if such a session is called, the answers would futher depend upon language included in any relaated proposed legislation. Print Friendly and PDF

Will there be pay or cost of living raise for State employees this year? If so how much?

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Will there be pay or cost of living raise for State employees this year? If so how much?
MOSERS does not determine annual pay raises for state employees. However, we checked with state budget and personnel staff and they indicated that the final budget did not include funding for pay increases for state employees. For more details, contact your agency personnel office.
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