If I retire and have chosen a survivor benefit for my spouse and my spouse dies first, does the benefit increase to the full amount?

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If I retire and have chosen a survivor benefit for my spouse and my spouse dies first, does the benefit increase to the full amount?
Yes. If you elect the Joint & 50% Survivor Option or the Joint & 100% Survivor Option and your spouse precedes you in death, your benefit will revert (popup) to the Life Income Annuity amount. The effective date of the pop-up will be the first of the month following your spouse’s date of death. The pop-up is not automatic. You must provide MOSERS with a certified copy of your spouse’s death certificate before your benefit will be adjusted. Print Friendly and PDF

I received the memo regarding the medical insurance retirement incentive legislation

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I received the memo regarding the medical insurance retirement incentive legislation and want to know if I have my spouse on my insurance and this incentive package passes, would he be covered and included in the active member rate? The memo states "may be eligible to continue medical coverage for themselves and, if applicable, their dependents at the active member rate.....". Thank you.
Yes, as presently drafted, your spouse would be covered under this provision if he is already covered by MCHCP under your medical benefits. If the bill passes in its present form and you were to retire directly from active employment during the incentive window, you, and any dependents (including your spouse) already receiving active medical benefits, would be eligible to keep medical benefits at the active rate for the first five years of retirement or until becoming eligible for Medicare coverage.
For those members employed by one of the regional universities or the department of Conservation, any potential incentive would be subject to the direction and approval of the appropriate governing body. Print Friendly and PDF

I saw that Senate Bill 748 was pre-filed on 12/7/2005 which would create a new retirement incentive

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I saw that Senate Bill 748 was pre-filed on 12/7/2005 which would create a new retirement incentive with the window of eligibility for employees whose "annuity" commences on or after May 15 but no later than August 15, 2006. I had planned to retire effective April 1, 2006 but would certainly hold off if this goes into effect. Since this bill shows an effective date as "emergency clause", assuming it passes can you give me a time frame I need to work with?
The bill has a window of May 15 to August 15. Since members must retire on the first day of a month, June, July and August would be the only applicable months. However, the bill must be signed into law by the Governor if it is passed by both the House and Senate. Governor Blunt would have to sign SB 748 into law prior to June 1 for June, July and August to be applicable, after June 1 but prior to July 1 for July and August to be applicable, and after July 1 but prior to August 1 for August to be applicable. At this point, we have no way of knowing whether the bill will pass, and, if so, when the Governor may sign it into law. Please keep in mind that applications for retirement must be filed at least two months prior to the desired effective date. Print Friendly and PDF

I understand that when you retire you “have to” at that time add your spouse to your

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I understand that when you retire you “have to” at that time add your spouse to your health insurance. This is something that puzzles me if my understanding of what the State has to pay is correct. As I understand it the State continues to pay a portion of your insurance premium and I assume that includes a portion of the premium when you have elected to add your spouse. My spouse is currently employed and has medical insurance through his employer which will continue until he retires and at present he does not have any immediate plans to retire. It seems to me that the State would save some money by removing this clause and allowing a retiree to add their spouse when their spouse is no longer covered under their employer’s insurance plan.
Since this question pertains to provisions of the health care plan, we asked the Missouri Consolidated Health Care Plan (MCHCP) to respond to this question. If you are covered by another health care plan, please contact that plan for further information.
MCHCP’s response:
You are correct that the provision found in RSMo Chapter 103, which governs MCHCP, requires that dependents be added at the time an employee retires. It would take statutory change to remove that requirement. This provision was included in the statutes to help stabilize cost increases to the plan. Print Friendly and PDF

Can you tell me why retirees do not have a cafeteria or flex pay plan?

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Can you tell me why retirees do not have a cafeteria or flex pay plan?
Also, when the Legislature passed the 80 and out provision for state retirement in the 90's, my impression was that the state wanted employees to retire so they could replace them with new and lower paid employees. Then the Legislature passed the "BackDROP Provision," which in turn promotes working past the the rule of 80 timetable, therefore encouraging employees to work beyond their earliest retirement eligibility age. What gives? Isn't this a mixed message?
Cafeteria plans, also called flexible savings accounts (FSA), are governed by federal regulations that restrict participants to employees only, which is why those benefits are unavailable to retirees. Since these plans are authorized and controlled by federal laws/regulations, the state cannot expand coverage to include retirees.
As to your question about the BackDROP provision, it might be helpful for you to know that the BackDROP was designed as a no cost addition to the current menu of retirement payment options. The provision was proposed by several legislators who were interested in developing a Deferred Retirement Option Plan (DROP) for state employees in Missouri because of interest from their constituents who were aware of similar plans in other states. These plans are fairly common throughout the country, but they are designed somewhat differently from state to state. In order to gain the support of the administration at that time, the legislation had to be cost neutral. Proponents felt that adding the BackDROP provision to the current menu of retirement options would help state agencies in succession planning and provide members with an additional benefit payment option, without increasing the cost to the state. Print Friendly and PDF

I am 60 years old and have 17 years of service. The retirement calculations on your website show me eligible for BackDROP

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I am 60 years old and have 17 years of service. The retirement calculations on your website show me eligible for BackDROP (assuming I continue to work...) when I turn 62. All the questions about BackDROP seem to refer to those who retire thru the '80 and out' provision. Do you have to qualify for '80 and out' to be eligible for BackDROP?
No, you do not have to qualify for the Rule of 80 (“80 & Out”) to be eligible for the BackDROP. You must only be eligible for normal retirement, under any provisions of the law, and continue to work in a benefit eligible position at least two years beyond first becoming eligible for normal retirement. Print Friendly and PDF

It is my understanding that an employee must physically be at work the last day before retirement. Is that correct?

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It is my understanding that an employee must physically be at work the last day before retirement. Is that correct?
There is nothing in the retirement law requiring that an employee physically be at work the last day before retirement. However, state agencies may have personnel rules that do go beyond the general law. You should check with your human resources office to find out whether or not your agency has such a requirement. Print Friendly and PDF