Showing posts with label 4% Contribution. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 4% Contribution. Show all posts

Contribution Refunds

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I’m considering accepting a job that participates in Moser. There is a substantial payroll contribution for the pension and that it takes five years to be vested. My question is if I do not work the full five years in order to be vested will my payroll contributions be available to me for withdrawal or transfer?
Anyone who is first employed in a MOSERS or MPERS benefit-eligible position on or after January 1, 2011 must contribute 4% of pay to the retirement system. Your 4% contribution is used to help pay the cost of your future defined benefit retirement plan and could potentially pay you back far more than you contribute. See a simplified example in The Value of Your Retirement Benefit. When you retire, you will receive a benefit payment every month for as long as you live. This means you can never outlive your MOSERS retirement benefit.

If you leave state employment prior to becoming eligible for normal retirement, you may request a refund of your contributions plus credited interest. By taking a refund, your forfeit all your credited service. Or, you may leave your contributions with the system if you think you might return to work for the state at some point in the future and would like for those years of service to count toward an eventual retirement benefit. See our Member Contributions brochure for more information. 

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Increasing Contributions?

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Is it possible to contribute more to your pension, to lower your retirement date and still receive a full pension.
No. The only potential way to move your retirement eligibility date closer is to purchase or transfer qualifying prior public service that you may have and combine it with your MOSERS pension. See our MSEP 2011 Acquiring Service Credit brochure for more information or contact a MOSERS benefit counselor to see if you qualify and if it would be beneficial for you to do so.

In order for any prior public service to qualify, it must have been full-time, nonfederal, public (government) employment that you performed in Missouri. Examples include prior employment with a public school, city, or county in Missouri, or employment covered by the MoDOT & Patrol Employees Retirement System (MPERS). This could potentially make you eligible for retirement sooner if the extra service resulted in you hitting the Rule of 90 prior to age 67. (The Rule of 90 is available only to those still actively employed by the state.)

You may also want to keep in mind that you are not required to keep working for the state until retirement age in order to get your pension. Once you are vested with MOSERS, even if you leave state employment, you will be eligible for a lifetime monthly benefit once you also meet the age and all other legal requirements and retire under a MOSERS defined benefit pension plan. Your benefit is calculated using the formula:
Final Average Pay x Credited Service x Multiplier = Monthly Base Benefit. 
Remember, it is this formula, NOT employee contributions (made by those first employed on or after 1/1/2011), that determines your monthly retirement benefit. The longer you work, the more your benefit will be.

You certainly can contribute more to MO Deferred Comp to increase your supplemental savings for retirement but it won’t make you eligible for retirement any sooner.

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COLAs

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I don't understand if mosers is profiting so well why do the retirees only get 1.5% raise. It seems like the pot gets bigger and why not pass it out. The cost of living goes up an up but the retirees are going backwards. I have been retired 14 years and only get 21% increase and Mosers does about 7.5% thats 147% increase. It looks a little lopsided. I know it's a complicated process. Like the ones that took the back drop you handed them a bonus that i never saw because I choose to retire and give a job to younger adults instead of letting them not work and the back droppers working filling that spot. 
The way that MOSERS is set up, neither staff nor Board Members can decide to increase cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) or monthly retirement benefits. It is all based on state statute and it all factors into the overall funding structure of the retirement system.

COLAs are calculated according to state statute (104.010.14 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri), which stipulates that the CPI used to calculate COLAs must be the “CPI-U (Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers). For most general state employees, the COLA is based on 80% of the percentage increase in the average CPI from one year to the next. COLAs are intended to help you cope with the rising cost of goods and services that you buy.  You can see a detailed explanation of how the 2018 COLA was calculated in January 2018.

Your benefit is calculated using the formula: Final Average Pay x Credited Service x Multiplier = Monthly Base Benefit. Benefit amounts vary for each retiree based on their individual pay and service history. Funding to pay benefits comes from three sources:

1. Contributions from Employers, as a percentage of employee payroll
2. Contributions from Employees first employed in a benefit-eligible position on or after January 1, 2011
3. Investment Returns

The purpose of investing trust fund assets is to provide a funding source that helps pay the cost of the benefits. Over that past 20 years, 61% of the assets in the MOSERS Trust Fund have come from investment returns. If it weren’t for the income from investments, the cost to the state and to members would be significantly higher. When calculating how much the state will have to contribute going forward, our external actuaries make assumptions on various economic and demographic factors. One is how much we can expect to earn from investment income. That assumption for FY18, which ended June 30, 2018, was 7.5%.

BackDROP isn’t a bonus. It is an benefit payment option available at retirement if an employee works at least two years beyond their normal retirement eligibility date. It allows such members to get a lump-sum payment in addition to their monthly benefit. However, none of their pay or service credit during their BackDROP period counts toward their monthly benefit. So, generally speaking, their monthly benefit is less if they elect BackDROP than it would have been had they not taken BackDROP.

Thank you for your question and for your service to the State of Missouri. Print Friendly and PDF

Withdrawing Funds

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Is is possible to withdraw a portion of our annuity?
No. MOSERS is a non-contributory defined benefit (DB) plan for members hired before January 1, 2011. As such a member, your employer pays the necessary contributions to MOSERS while you are actively employed so that you may receive a future monthly retirement benefit and potential survivor benefits. Since you do not pay contributions, you are not eligible to withdraw funds from the retirement system.

Members employed in a MOSERS-covered position for the first time on or after January 1, 2011 are required to contribute 4% of their gross salary to help fund the retirement system. Those members, if they leave state employment, have the option of requesting a refund of the contributions they have made to MOSERS plus any interest on their contributions – if they do so prior to reaching normal retirement eligibility. Any member who receives a refund will forfeit service credit and the right to receive any future retirement benefits from MOSERS.

Any refund of contributions taken as cash (as opposed to rolling it over to MO Deferred Comp, a traditional IRA, or other qualified retirement plan) is considered taxable income for the year you receive it. MOSERS is required to withhold 20% for federal taxes on such a refund. If you receive a cash payment before you reach age 59½ and do not roll it over, you may have to pay an IRS a penalty equal to 10% of the taxable portion of the payment in addition to the regular income tax. See our Special Tax Notice for more information.

The IRS does not currently allow pension plans to offer lump-sum payouts to current retirees in exchange for reduced future benefit payments. MOSERS did offer a buyout program which enabled eligible members to accept a lump-sum payment in lieu of all future annuity payments. However, this program was not available to members who had already begun receiving monthly benefits.

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Funded Status

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I have heard reports on the news saying that our retirement benefits are only 60% funded and that MOSERS is in trouble. What is going on with that? 
Just to clarify, MOSERS pays 100% of the benefits due to members. The “funded” status that you are hearing about in the news has to do with the assets we have on hand relative to all current and future liabilities. As of June 30, 2017, MOSERS is 67.5% funded (p. 129 FY17 Annual Report).

Your MOSERS Board of Trustees is actively engaged in prudent analysis, plan sustainability, and benefit security for members. The Board's recent decisions to reduce the assumed rate of return on investments will result in higher employer contributions and a lower funded status in the short term but will strengthen MOSERS’ financial position in the long term. Each year, the MOSERS Board certifies an employer contribution rate which results in a state budget appropriations request. The employer contribution is based on a variety of factors and is calculated by our external actuary as the amount needed in order for MOSERS to pay current and future benefits.

Money to pay your retirement benefits comes from three sources:

1. Employer Contributions: The Missouri General Assembly has consistently appropriated the full employer contribution to MOSERS as recommended by our external actuary. Governor Parson signed the FY19 budget bills passed by the General Assembly, including the MOSERS appropriation contained in HB 2005, which fully funds the Board certified employer contribution rate. Pension systems that are in trouble are generally those that have a consistent pattern of not receiving the full amount of employer contributions.

2. Employee Contributions: Members first employed in a MOSERS or MPERS benefit-eligible position on or after 1/1/2011 contribute 4% of pay to their retirement system.

3. Investment Returns: Over that past 20 years, 61% of the assets in the MOSERS Trust Fund have come from investment returns. MOSERS earned approximately 7.5% for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2018, which added approximately $600 million to the MOSERS trust fund.

Please see Key Facts Regarding Funding for more information. We will send a summary annual financial report for Fiscal Year 2018 to all members in December as part of the fall/winter newsletter.

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State Contribution to Retirement?

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Does the State of Missouri contribute any matching funds to the retirement program?
I am receiving conflicting information, that there are and are not matching funds. I've been told 0 and "up to 3%."
As a MOSERS benefit-eligible member, you have a defined benefit pension plan, which provides lifetime monthly benefit payments to you after you retire. It is based on the formula: 

Final Average Pay x Credited Service x a Multiplier = Your Monthly Base Benefit.

Remember, it is this formula, NOT contributions, that determines your monthly retirement benefit. 
There are three sources of income that fund your MOSERS defined benefit pension plan: 

1. Contributions from members of the MSEP 2011 and the Judicial Plan 2011, which are 4% of pay,
2. Your employer’s contributions, which are currently, 20.21% of covered payroll, and 
3. MOSERS’ investment income. 

You can read more about plan funding on our website. If you leave state employment prior to normal retirement eligibility, you may request a refund of your member contributions plus interest. (Your member contributions consist of #1 above; #2 and #3 remain in the MOSERS trust fund.) Interest on member contributions is calculated using the 52-week treasury bill rate. 

You may also participate in the State of Missouri Deferred Compensation Plan (MO Deferred Comp), which is a supplemental retirement savings program. Currently, the State does not match any contributions to MO Deferred Comp, but there are many other reasons that MO Deferred Comp is an important part of your benefit package. 

Watch our New Employee Orientation video for a quick overview of your MOSERS benefits. 

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4% Contribution for MSEP 2011

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My daughter is considering becoming employed for a state agency and is curious if she will be required to put a % of her pay check towards her retirement since she will be hired after the 1/1/2018 and the new rule that is in place.
Yes, anyone who is first employed in a MOSERS or MPERS benefit-eligible position on or after January 1, 2011 must contribute 4% of pay to the retirement system. Your daughter's 4% contribution is used to help pay the cost of her future defined benefit retirement plan and could potentially pay her back far more than she contributes. See a simplified example in The Value of Your Retirement Benefit. When she retires, she will receive a benefit payment every month for as long as she lives. This means she can never outlive her MOSERS retirement benefit.

If she leaves state employment prior to becoming eligible for normal retirement, she may request a refund of her contributions plus credited interest. Or, she may leave her contributions with the system if she thinks she might return to work for the state at some point in the future and would like for those years of service to count toward an eventual retirement benefit. See our Member Contributions brochure for more information.


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MSEP 2011 Retirement Eligibility

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Vesting is changed to 5 years, so why is the monthly benefit not payable until 10 years? If I were to retire after 8 years, would I receive a lump sum payout of my contributions plus any amount vested by the plan, or would the benefit be deferred until after 10 years?
Vesting is one part of retirement eligibility. The other part is age. Both vesting and age requirements must be met in order to retire under a MOSERS defined benefit plan. As a member of MSEP 2011, you will become eligible for normal retirement when you have at least 5 years of service and reach age 67 OR under the “Rule of 90” which is when you are at least age 55 and your age plus service equals 90 prior to you leaving state employment.

Once you are vested with MOSERS, even if you leave state employment, you will be eligible for lifetime monthly benefit payments once you also meet the age requirement (and any other legal requirements) and retire under a MOSERS defined benefit pension plan. The 5-year vesting for MSEP 2011 members went into effect on 1/1/2018 and MSEP 2011 members must be actively employed on or after 1/1/2018 to be covered by this change.

Your contributions go toward helping pay for your future lifetime monthly benefit payments. You will receive a lump-sum payment only if you request a refund of your member contributions. By taking a refund, your forfeit all your credited service. If you are vested and take a refund, you give up your future lifetime monthly benefit payments.

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Saver's Tax Credit

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A friend under tier 2011 wants to know if their 4% contribution towards retirement is eligible for the federal saver's tax credit. Some places on the web seem to call the employee contribution a 457 (deferred comp) plan. No where else is it referred to by any plan name (IRA, 403B, 401K) that would clarify what it is. To make it more confusing, the contribution is in box 14 of their W-2 with code EE after it. If it was in box 12, code EE would mean it was a 457 plan and would be saver's credit eligible, but there is no definition of what this means in box 14. Did they make a mistake?
No, the 4% employee contributions made by members of the MSEP 2011 or the Judicial Plan 2011 to MOSERS do not qualify for the retirement Savers Credit because these contributions are mandatory contributions. The MOSERS defined benefit plan is classified as a qualified retirement plan. However, only voluntary contributions to a qualified retirement plan are eligible for the retirement savers credit. The 4% contributions are made on a pre-tax basis and used to help pay the cost of future retirement benefits. On the W-2 form, contributions to the MOSERS defined benefit plan should be listed in Box 14, but there are no standard codes to indicate the type of contribution. It is optional for the employer to report these contributions on the W-2.

The MO Deferred Comp Plan is a voluntary governmental 457(b) plan designed to help employees save additional income to supplement their defined benefit pension and social security benefits in retirement. The deferred compensation plan provides a convenient way to save extra money for retirement through payroll deduction. Voluntary contributions to MO Deferred Comp, or another governmental 457(b) plan, are eligible for the Saver’s Credit. Keep in mind, the credit is for low- to moderate-income taxpayers and calculated using their adjusted gross income (AGI) and filing status. Learn more about the Saver’s Credit on the IRS website. On the W-2 form, contributions to MO Deferred Comp, a 457(b) plan, are listed in Box 12. A code of G indicates a 457(b) plan and a code of EE indicates designated Roth contributions under a governmental section 457(b) plan.

Please see the instructions for IRS Form 8880 for more information concerning this credit.

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Is the MSEP 2011 Still a Contributory Plan?

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I have an employee who was hired June 2011. He has a question about the 5 year vesting. Since 5 year vesting is back he would like to know if Moser's will start contributing to retirement or if he will still have to make those contributions through his payroll.
MSEP 2011 members will still have to contribute 4% of pay to their future retirement benefit. Other than the vesting period changing from 10 years to 5 years for MSEP 2011 members employed on or after January 1, 2018, the provisions of SB 62 have NO impact on members of MSEP 2011 who work in a MOSERS benefit-eligible position until they reach normal retirement eligibility.

Money to pay current and future MOSERS pension benefits comes from:

  1. Contributions from employees who are members of the MSEP 2011 or Judicial Plan 2011 (4% of pay for MOSERS members; typically 5-10% nationally*),
  2. Earnings on investments of money in the MOSERS trust fund (61% of assets in the MOSERS trust fund have come from investment earnings), and
  3. Contributions from employers (state agencies) as a percent of active employee payroll.

Below is a simplified example of what future retirement benefit might look like over time. The benefit would be even more with compounding cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs), which are included in MSEP 2011, but not shown here for simplicity. The benefit formula is:

Final Average Pay x Credit Service x Multiplier = Monthly Base Benefit



























*Understanding Public Pensions, April 2017, Center for State & Local Government Excellence, AARP




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MSEP 2011 Members and SB 62

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I was hired July 2013, I will now be vested in 5 years instead of 10. My question is will I still have to contribute 4 percent to my retirement and will I still be 90 and out. thank you.
Yes, you will still have to contribute 4% of pay to your future retirement benefit. It is important to note that the 5-year vesting for MSEP 2011 members will go into effect on 1/1/2018. MSEP 2011 members must be actively employed on or after 1/1/2018 to be covered by this change.

Members of MSEP 2011 will become eligible for normal retirement when they are age 67 and have 5 years of service OR under the “Rule of 90” which is when they are at least age 55 and their age and service equal 90 when they terminate/leave state employment.

For more information on vesting, see The Change from 10 to 5-Year Vesting for MSEP 2011 Members.

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MSEP 2011 Changes?

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I just read your article that states
• In 2010, the legislature made changes to state employee pensions which, among other cost-saving measures, requires employees to contribute 4% of pay and increases the retirement age from 62 to 67.
I am in the MSEP 2000 plan. Does this change apply to me
No, the 2010 plan changes do not apply to you if you are a member of MSEP or MSEP 2000. The changes affect only those employed in a MOSERS or MPERS benefit-eligible position for the first time on or after 01/01/2011. Those members belong to the new tier referred to as the MSEP 2011. Members who aren’t sure which plan they belong to can go to the Which Plan Am I In? webpage. Print Friendly and PDF

Do MSEP 2011 member contributions count towards limits?

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I am enrolled in the MSEP 2011 plan. I also contribute to a Roth IRA. Does the mandatory 4% of salary member contribution count towards my IRA annual contribution limits?
No, they are completely separate.  You can contribute the full amount into your Roth IRA and the 4% retirement contributions will not count against that.

If low Roth IRA contribution limits are impacting your ability to save more, remember that the State of Missouri Deferred Compensation Plan also offers a Roth (after-tax) savings option. The combined contribution limits for after-tax (Roth) and pre-tax savings in this plan are $17,500 in 2014 and $18,000 in the 2015 tax year. Savers over 50 or within three years of their normal retirement age can save even more by utilizing the Plan’s catch-up provisions

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Can you opt out of retirement contributions?

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HOW CAN I OPT OUT OF THE MANDATORY 6% PAYMENT TOWARDS MY RETIREMENT ACCOUNT?
If you were first hired in a MOSERS covered position on or after January 1, 2011, then you are a member of the MSEP 2011, and you are required by law to contribute by payroll deduction, 4%  (not 6%) of gross pay for your MOSERS retirement benefit. Your 4% contribution is used to help pay the cost of your future retirement benefit.

This contribution is made on a pre-tax basis and you will receive no less than the amount you contribute. There are three sources of income that contribute to the funding of your retirement benefit; (1) your mandatory 4% contribution, (2) your employer’s contribution (currently, 16.97% of covered payroll), and (3) MOSERS’ investment income. More than two-thirds of the money needed to pay future retirement benefits comes from earnings on investments.

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Do I Contribute 4% to MOSERS?

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I was hired before the pension contribution change. If I change jobs now to another department of the state, will my retirement funds go with me to the new department? Will my pension still be 100% funded by the State or will I have to contribute 4%? Thank you
The 4% employee contribution applies only to those who were first hired in a benefit-eligible position on or after January 1, 2011. If you began work in a MOSERS benefit-eligible position before January 1, 2011, you do not have to contribute the 4%. You can read more about which plan you are in on our website.

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