Showing posts with label Missouri. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Missouri. Show all posts

Non-Missouri Retirees & Taxes

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Are Public Pension benefits taxable if the MOSER retiree now resides in a state other than Missouri? I understand Missouri does not tax MOSER pensions.
MOSERS withholds state taxes only for Missouri residents. If you aren’t a Missouri resident in retirement, contact the appropriate state and local tax authorities to determine the taxability of your MOSERS benefit.

As we reminded our retirees in the Fall/Winter issue of RetireeNews, remember that pension benefits are subject to federal taxes.

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Missouri Public Pension Exemption

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I have heard a rumor that the exemption from state income taxes for the state pension and deferred comp is going away. Please comment.
We are not aware of any changes to the Missouri Public Pension Exemption. We included a reminder about the exemption in the Fall/Winter issue of RetireeNews that is now online and on its way to mailboxes soon. For specific questions, we would suggest you contact the Missouri Department of Revenue or your tax professional. Print Friendly and PDF

Taxes on Retirement Benefit

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Are retirement payments taxed?
Yes, retirement benefits are considered taxable income and Missouri income tax and federal income tax can be withheld from your MOSERS monthly retirement payments.

However, in a recent RetireeNews article we described the public pension exemption. Depending on a variety of factors (including, but not limited to, income, filing status, and age) you may be able to deduct some or all of your public retirement benefit on your Missouri tax return, to the extent the amounts are included in your federal adjusted gross income. MOSERS recommends you contact the Department of Revenue or a qualified tax advisor for additional information or answers to your specific questions about the public pension exemption.

At retirement, you may specify your federal and state tax withholding preferences by completing a Tax Withholding Authorization (Substitute W4-P) form, which you can do by logging into your Member Homepage on MOSERS’ website. MOSERS has a federal tax calculator on our website to help estimate your withholdings:
https://www.mosers.org/Members/Calculators/Federal-Tax-Calculator.aspx

MOSERS will withhold state taxes only for Missouri residents. If you aren’t a Missouri resident in retirement, we recommend you contact the appropriate state and local tax authorities to determine the taxability of your MOSERS benefit.

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Retirement Related News for 12/11/2015

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From MOSERS: Rick Dahl Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

MOSERS' CIO, Rick Dahl, was presented his Lifetime Achievement award from CIO Magazine at the Industry Innovation Awards on December 3rd.”

From the CIO award honoree information:

Rick Dahl's "investment acumen is light years ahead of many of his peers," according to Chris Ailman, CIO of California State Teachers' Retirement System. "His willingness and ability to develop synthetic portfolios and exposure is unique."

From the Jefferson City News Tribune: Our Opinion: State Workers Extend Spirit of Generosity

We commend Missouri’s state employees for extending their tradition of personal generosity.

The results of this year’s Missouri State Employee Charitable Campaign (MSECC) continue to be impressive. Consider these numbers reported Tuesday by the Missouri Office of Administration, which coordinates the campaign.

• State employees this donated more than $1,089,249 to 885 Missouri charities.

• This marks the 12th consecutive year contributions have exceeded $1 million.

• In its 31-year history, the state campaign has raised more than $28 million.

From CNN Money: Retired? How Much Money Should You Keep In Stocks?

Considering how many retirees must grapple with this issue and the fact that allocating one's assets between stocks and bonds is a key element of any retirement income plan, you might think that there would be a stocks-bonds mix that most retirement experts would generally agree is correct.

But there's not, so I can't give you a specific percentage to shoot for.

I can, however, point you to three ways that investors typically deal with this issue, and then tell you what I think you should do to arrive at a reasonable blend of stocks and bonds for your own nest egg.

From Forbes: Three Warning Signs Your Aging Parent Needs Help Handling Finances

Family get togethers can be eye openers. If you haven’t seen aging loved ones in awhile, the visible evidence that they are getting older can be a wake-up call. It can be hard for all of us to accept the effects of passing years on our minds and bodies. We want our aging parents to stay how they used to be. For adult children, and I’m one of them, we understand that our aging loved one just needs more help as time goes by. In our family, it’s about mobility. In other families with cognitive decline as an issue, it can be about taking charge of things you’ve never dealt with before. Finances are one of those things, always a touchy subject. But that’s an area where we need to be ever vigilant.

Holidays near year-end are a time when a lot of people feel generous and do their charitable giving. A lot of scammers know this and seek out the elderly, targeting them for special attention and attempts to get their money. The Federal government’s Office for Older Americans publishes warnings about this regularly. Somehow, these warnings do not necessarily reach the very ones they are intended to protect. So, it’s up to us, the family to be on the lookout.

From PLANSPONSOR: New Model of Retiree Spending Highlights Role of Marriage

New research from the Michigan Retirement Research Center shows important differences in the retirement outlooks of singles and couples.

Findings from a new research paper, “Couples’ and Singles’ Savings After Retirement,” by Mariacristina De Nardi, Eric French and John Bailey Jones, suggest singles “live less long than people who are part of a couple, but are more likely to end up in a nursing home in any given year.”

For that reason, the researchers suggest, a single should expect to have higher medical spending than a member of a couple.
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