Showing posts with label aging. Show all posts
Showing posts with label aging. Show all posts

Retirement Related News for 11/13/2015

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From LifeHealthPRO: Aging In America

One day, while flitting about on earth, the Greek goddess, Eos, met and fell in love with a mortal. Eos went to her father, Zeus, and said, “please, Father, give Tithonus immortality.”

“Are you sure that’s what you want?” Zeus responded.

“Yes, Father, more than anything.”

Like any father with a beloved daughter (goddess or not), Zeus bowed to her beauty and did as he was told, granting Tithonus immortality. Only there was one snag in the arrangement — Eos never asked for eternal youth along with immortality. Over the centuries, Tithonus, unable to die, but with a withered and crumbling body, lived on. Eos, blessed with eternal youth, watched her beloved age and wither, his bones reduced to dust, yet he lived on — he lived on and on and on, well beyond what anyone would consider an enviable quality of life.

Gerontologist and aging expert Ken Dychtwald loves to tell that mythical tale, the story a perfect metaphor to describe our aging population and the modern world’s God-like ability to keep people alive.

“On the first day of the 20th century,” says Dychtwald. “the average life expectancy was 47. As the century closed, it was 78. Today, it’s approaching 80 and continuing to rise.”

From The Kansas City Star: Former Missouri Lawmaker Ray Salva Says Federal Conviction Shouldn’t Affect His State Pension

Former Missouri lawmaker Ray Salva, a convicted felon, is locked in a legal dispute with the state of Missouri over whether he qualifies for a state pension.

Salva, 68, pleaded guilty in 2013 to a federal charge of illegally receiving Social Security payments while working as a state legislator. Missouri says the state’s constitution bars pension payments to public officials convicted of felonies, so it cut off his pension and has now asked a judge to order Salva to repay nearly $30,000 he has already received.

But Salva says he is entitled to the pension because his guilty plea came more than two years after he left the legislature. The constitutional prohibition on pension payments to felons only applies to convictions that take place while a public official is actually in office, he argues.

From Time: How To Solve America’s Retirement Crisis

Economist Teresa Ghilarducci knows firsthand how passionate Americans can be about their retirement dreams. In 2008, after she suggested Congress let workers trade in their 401(k) retirement accounts for annuities, talk-radio hosts accused her of trying to kill the 401(k). She got death threats.

She wasn’t deterred, though, from her decades-long crusade, via research and advocacy, to improve retirement security. Now teaching at the New School in New York City, she has, among other duties, served on the advisory board of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. and been a trustee of the Indiana state employees’ retirement fund. Ghilarducci calls retirement the most important financial issue facing both families and governments. “Everybody knows that they will get old,” she says, “and everybody fears not having enough.” She offers solutions in her latest book, How to Retire With Enough Money, and How to Know What Enough Is. Read on for her proposals and practical advice.

From The St. Joe Channel: SJSD Receives New Federal Subpoena

The St. Joseph School District has received a new federal subpoena as the FBI continues its investigation into the district.

The district announced Tuesday that it received a subpoena Monday night to produce records from the St. Joseph School District to the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri.

"This was really out of the blue and unbeknownst to us," said Superintendent Robert Newhart, during a news conference at district headquarters Tuesday afternoon.

Newhart said they received the subpoena during their Board of Education meeting Monday evening.

Many were hoping that the FBI was nearing the end of what has become a 19 month investigation. It began in April 2014 after an audit by the Missouri State Auditor's Office revealed a stipend system that paid out anywhere from $25-40 million dating back to 2000.

From Forbes: Social Security Q&A: How Can I Maximize Benefits Under the New Rules?

Social Security may be one of your largest assets. What and when you collect will make a huge difference to your lifetime benefits.

Today’s Social Security column explores twelve secrets to get the highest benefits now that Social Security’s rules have changed and answers other questions.

The 2015 Budget dramatically changed Social Security claiming options. ​Every day I get a host of emails from the victims of these changes. Most are like my 64-year-old secretary, who I wrote about last week, who, thanks to Congress and the President, lost her ability at age 66 to do three things: a) get a child benefit for her severely disabled child, b) a get spousal benefit for her non-working husband who has had to stay home and care for their child for years, and c) file for her retirement benefit, immediately suspend it and wait until 70 to collect her highest possible retirement benefit.

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